AASE

AASE

Who created AASE?

SkillsActive, National Governing Bodies (NGBs) of sport and industry experts developed the programme in 2004 to ensure top young athletes seeking to perform at the highest level receive the support and training they need to succeed in elite sport. The programme has also been designed so that if an athlete falls short of their ultimate goal, they have the skills, knowledge and qualifications to pursue a secondary of supplementary career.

The Apprenticeship programme is fully funded by the Skills Funding Agency.



Download the AASE Prospectus


Who is eligible for AASE?

SkillsActive works with NGBs and Sport England to develop sport specific entry requirements, ensuring the most talented athletes are selected for the programme. To be eligible for selection you must be aged 16-19 and:

  • have a proven ability and/or the potential to play at the highest level in your sport, determined in collaboration with the NGB
  • be subject to academic entry requirements.
  • meet Apprenticeship Funding Eligibility criteria.

You must also be either:

  • a professional, full-time athlete
  • an athlete identified by an NGB as ‘elite’
  • an athlete involved in the academy environment at professional clubs

What is AASE?

The Advanced Level Apprenticeship in Sporting Excellence (AASE) is a sports performance programme. It provides a structured training and development route across a number of sports for talented young athletes (aged 16-19), who have a real chance of excelling in their sport; either by competing on the world stage or securing a professional contract. The programme length varies depending on the sport but can be from 12 months to 24 months.

The AASE programme reflects the range of skills, knowledge and performance criteria required in elite level sport. It is designed to directly measure the athlete’s ability to plan, apply and evaluate their development in the appropriate technical, tactical, physical and psychological aspects of their sport. It also addresses wider issues such as lifestyle, career development, communication and health and safety.

There are currently more than 2500 athletes on the AASE throughout England. More than 20 sports are currently involved in the AASE, including football, rugby union, rowing, boxing, tennis, swimming, and disability including a large number of Olympic and Commonwealth sports.

How does AASE work?

You can complete AASE through one of two pathways:

Pathway one Pathway two
Competence
qualification
NVQ Diploma in Achieving
Excellence in Sports
Performance
Certificate in Achieving
Excellence in Sports
Performance
Knowledge
qualification
One of three qualifications:
• Level 3 Subsidiary
Diploma in Sport
• Level 3 Diploma in
Sport (Performance &
Excellence)
• Level 3 Extended
Diploma in Sport
(Performance &
Excellence)
Certificate in
Understanding
Sports Performance
Hover for more info
Length of
programme
18 – 24 months 12 – 20 months

Other programme requirements:

Apprentices on both pathways are also required to complete the following components of the programme:

Functional Skills

Functional Skills are the skills needed for success in education, training and day-to-day work such as writing, communication and basic maths. AASE athletes must complete this component if they have not achieved Grade C or above in GCSE Maths and/or English or Key Skills. Functional Skills carry UCAS points needed to go to university.

Personal Learning and Thinking Skills (PLTS)

PLTS will be delivered, demonstrated, assessed and evidenced as part of the mandatory units of the Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance/ Certificate in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance.

Employee Rights and Responsibilities

Apprentices learn about employee rights and responsibilities will be through the apprentice's induction programme and completion of the competence qualification.

AASE Portfolio

To achieve the AASE NVQ diploma/ Certificate in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance, apprentices must produce a portfolio demonstrating what they have learnt about each of the units during their sporting pursuits. This could include a training log, a nutrition diary, video samples or a journal. You must also work with a qualified assessor to test your understanding and work-based performance.

Please note apprentices are able to complete additional learning through a part time programme for a maximum of 16 hours per week; this may include A-levels.

Exemption from mandatory employment

The November 2009 Apprenticeship Act states that all apprentices need to be employed and earning the national minimum wage from day one of starting on their Apprenticeship programme. However, following negotiations with Government, Olympics, Paralympics and Commonwealth Sports are exempt from mandatory employment.

Where can athletes complete AASE?

National Governing Bodies of sport deliver the AASE programme differently. Depending on the sport apprentices can either:

  • stay at their existing school or college and train at their home club. AASE athletes will also be required to attend additional training, workshops and camps for the NVQ Diploma
  • attend an AASE academy for the full AASE programme

Why should talented athletes join the AASE programme?

  • The AASE programme helps develop and nurture elite athletes and is the perfect programme for aspiring athletes.
  • AASE also provides for second career development, should an athlete fall short of their ultimate sporting goal or choose to follow an alternative career path. This includes work within the related fields of coaching, sport development, health and fitness and sports leadership.
  • AASE apprentices get more quality coaching hours and better access to modern, well-equipped facilities and new technologies
  • AASE coaches are highly qualified and have experience in a high quality academy or intensive training environments
  • AASE apprentices also benefit from additional expertise including strength and conditioning experts, physiotherapists, nutritionists and mentors
  • The programme encourages apprentices to be responsible for their own time management, commitment and skill development.

When apprentices finish AASE, what happens next?

Once apprentices have successfully completed the AASE programme, they can progress down one of many routes:

Secondary career

The AASE programme recognises that not all apprentices will continue to compete at the highest level. A person’s sporting career can be cut short unexpectedly by injury, loss of form and financial constraints. The combination of academic theory and practical and vocational learning fully prepares athletes for the working world and/ or higher education. AASE equips apprentices to pursue a career in whichever direction they want to go - and provides them with expert advice to help get them there. The SkillsActiveCareers website showcases a number of career pathways and specific job information for those interested in a future career in sport and leisure. It also features video interviews and virtual tours of working environments. For quality assured sector information with fantastic technological resources visit SkillsActiveCareers

Secondary career The AASE programme recognises that not all apprentices will continue to compete at the highest level. A person’s sporting career can be cut short unexpectedly by injury, loss of form and financial constraints. The combination of academic theory and practical and vocational learning fully prepares athletes for the working world and/ or higher education. AASE equips apprentices to pursue a career in whichever direction they want to go - and provides them with expert advice to help get them there. The SkillsActiveCareers website showcases a number of career pathways and specific job information for those interested in a future career in sport and leisure. It also features video interviews and virtual tours of working environments. For quality assured sector information with fantastic technological resources visit SkillsActiveCareers.

Professional contract or full-time sports performance

Either with a professional club, through Lottery funding and the World Class Performance programme, or on a relevant ‘tour’

A wide choice of semi-professional or sports related careers

AASE athletes can access expert careers advice from NGBs, SkillsActive and careers advisors on what jobs are suitable for them. Sports related careers would include, Sports Coach, Support Officer in High Performance Environment.

Further/Higher Education

The NVQ Diploma/ Certificate in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance do not currently carry UCAS points. Other elements of the programme including Btec qualifications and functional skills do carry UCAS points. Examples of qualifications an AASE apprentice may go on to study include:

  • Foundation Degree in Sports Coaching/ Sports Science/ Sports Science with Sports
  • Development and Management, Higher National Diploma in Sport and Exercise Science
  • Undergraduate degree programmes: BSc Sport and Exercise Science/ Sport Management

Apprentices can also progress into a variety of job roles within the active leisure and learning sector on completion of this advanced programme. Secondary career The AASE programme recognises that not all apprentices will continue to compete at the highest level. A person’s sporting career can be cut short unexpectedly by injury, loss of form and financial constraints. The combination of academic theory and practical and vocational learning fully prepares athletes for the working world and/ or higher education. AASE equips apprentices to pursue a career in whichever direction they want to go - and provides them with expert advice to help get them there. The SkillsActiveCareers website showcases a number of career pathways and specific job information for those interested in a future career in sport and leisure. It also features video interviews and virtual tours of working environments. For quality assured sector information with fantastic technological resources visit www.skillsactive.com/careers

Success Stories

AASE alumni apprentices have achieved huge success in the sporting arena, including Olympic and Paralympic medals, Commonwealth medals and professional contracts.

Past AASE athletes include:

  • Rebecca Adlington - Double Olympic Gold Medallist Swimmer
  • Jack Wilshere - Arsenal 1st Team Player and England International
  • Sarah Stevenson - Olympic Medallist Taekwondo Athlete
  • Rachel Jennings - Ladies European Tour Player and Former England International

 

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